Evaluation of investment in cycling

Project details

Full project title: Evaluation of investment in cycling

Sponsors: Department for Transport

Project Managers: Dr Kiron Chatterjee and Professor Graham Parkhurst

Project partners: AECOM, Tavistock Institute

Start date: February 2009

Finish date: October 2012

Related link: UWE press release about this project

Project summary

The Department for Transport has commissioned a wide-ranging new study to evaluate the Government's investment in cycling. The study is being led by AECOM in association with the Centre for Transport and Society (CTS) and the Tavistock Institute and will focus on the Cycling City and Towns (CCT) Programme.

The CCT programme, which is being delivered by Cycling England, is a major new approach to town-wide investment in cycling, and this study aims to fully understand and demonstrate the overall effects of the programme. In particular, the evaluation will provide qualitative and quantitative answers to questions such as which groups of people are cycling more; why they are doing so, and what the wider effects of interventions will be.

Social research investigation

CTS is involved in the design and analysis of social research investigating the town-wide impacts of the CCT programme (using both surveys and qualitative research) and in the evaluation of individual measures/packages implemented within the 12 cycle city/towns.

Quantitative data is being obtained through a baseline household survey which is taking place summer-autumn 2009 in the 12 cycle city/towns and an 'after' survey planned for summer-autumn 2012. The survey covers demographics, socioeconomics, vehicle ownership, cycling behaviour, overall physical activity and attitudes to cycling. A seven-day diary is completed by a subset of households.

UWE public health experts

CTS is also involving UWE public health experts in the study. Dr Jane Powell is providing advice on evaluating the health benefits of cycling and Professor Elizabeth Towner is providing advice on evaluating school and young people cycle initiatives.

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