Heritage, Adaptation and Interpretation (HAI)

Historic buildings and places constitute a significant cultural asset both in terms of the tangible (the built form) and intangible (value, memory, identity). The study of pre-existing buildings and places therefore represents both a technical and humanities-based endeavour, ranging from the techniques of conservation and retro-fit to curation, interpretation and, indeed, an investigation into the notion of heritage itself.

Research active staff have established links with a wide range of institutions including English Heritage, Historic Scotland, the National Trust, Bath Abbey, the Roman Baths and, through the British Academy, heritage and conservation professionals in Egypt. Projects range in breadth from techniques by which difficult-to-access spaces can be accurately surveyed and the application of Building Information Management tools to the heritage environment, through to addressing questions of authenticity, the value of the architectural replica and the efficacy of narratives through which places are valued and understood.

Research topics

  • Adaptation of built heritage.
  • Significance of cultural assets as tangible (the built form) and intangible (value, memory, identity).
  • Techniques of conservation and retro-fit.
  • Techniques of surveying difficult-to-access spaces.
  • Retro-fit, curation and interpretation.
  • Investigation into the notion of heritage.
  • Authenticity of retrofit solutions, the value of the architectural replica and the efficacy of narratives through which places are valued and understood.

For further information, please contact the theme leader, David Littlefield

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