Education and Employability research cluster

About us

The education and employability research cluster focuses on contributing to the research in:

  • the scholarship of teaching and learning focusing on higher education experiences and developments from the student and academic perspective (across but not restricted to accounting, economics, business management and finance);
  • labour market questions e.g. including employability, developments in labour market structures and policy.

Research and engagement

We have established a reputation for contributing to the debate on pluralist teaching as well as developing research around employability questions and labour market developments in general. Researchers in this cluster share a desire to understand the student and staff experience in higher education as well as how these connect into the labour market. The research focus is broad and ranges from understanding particular experiences such as teaching approaches, placements or student employment outcomes, to broader questions around the structure, policies and developments in labour markets.

The Cluster is interdisciplinary and seeks to promote collaboration across the accounting and finance departments as well as with other education and labour researchers within UWE Bristol. The Cluster also provides practical support to academics who are planning to become research active in the fields of education and in labour market research. The cluster welcomes academics, researchers, practitioners and students interested in education and labour debates. New members at any stage in their research career are welcome to contact Josie Englishby or Dr Lotta Takala-Greenish for more information about upcoming seminars and workshops for research development and dissemination.

People

This cluster comprises of the following members and specific areas of research interest:

Selected publications

  • Adelopo, I., Asante, J., Dart, E. and Rufai, I. (2017)  Learning groups: The effects of group diversity on the quality of group reflection. Accounting Education, 26 (5-6). pp. 553-575. ISSN 0963-9284 Available from: http://eprints.uwe.ac.uk/31709.
  • Guizzo, D. (2018)  Review of Tavasci & Ventimiglia (eds.) Teaching the History of Economic Thought. History of Economic Ideas, XXVI (2). p. 192. ISSN 1724-2169 Available from: http://eprints.uwe.ac.uk/38652.
  • Mearman, A., Guizzo, D. and Berger, S. (2018)  Whither political economy? Evaluating the CORE project as a response to calls for change in economics teaching. Review of Political Economy, 30 (2). pp. 241-259. ISSN 0953-8259 Available from: http://eprints.uwe.ac.uk/33087.
  • Guizzo, D. and Takala-Greenish, L. (2018)  Teaching to think: Challenges and suitability of teaching inequality topics in a business school. International Journal of Pluralism and Economics Education, 9 (1/2). pp. 106-127. ISSN 1757-5656 Available from: http://eprints.uwe.ac.uk/34427.
  • Ritchie, F., Green, E., Newman, J. and Parker, T. (2017)  Lessons learned in training ‘safe users’ of confidential data. In: Worksession on statistical data confidentiality 2017, Skopje, FYR Macedonia, 20-22 September 2017. Luxembourg: Eurostat Available from: http://eprints.uwe.ac.uk/36264.

Back to top