Cyclist and pedestrian interactions on shared use paths

Project details

Full project title: Walking and Cycling Interactions on shared use paths

Sponsor: Centre for Transport and Society Studentship

Research student: Hannah Delaney

Supervisory team: Professor Graham Parkhurst and Dr Steve Melia

Start date: October 2012

Finish date: October 2015

Research briefing sheet: Download Briefing Sheet

Project summary

This PhD project aims to examine the relationships between cyclists and pedestrians on shared-use paths. A shared-use cycle and pedestrian path is a space of mobility used by both pedestrians and cyclists, it can be segregated or non-segregated. The promotion of cycling and walking is prominent in local and national transport policy as a solution to problems such as obesity, traffic congestion and climate change. However, little attention has been given to the interactions between cyclists and pedestrians on shared-use paths and the consequential issues associated with these interactions. This project aims to address this gap, and in turn inform local transport strategies and path design guidelines.

This research asks questions such as; what are the different kinds of interactions that occur on shared-use paths? How and why do they occur and what impact do they have on journey experience? What are the differences between the mobile sensory experiences of walking and cycling, on shared-use paths? Do path users have positive/negative attributions towards sharing space? How and why do particular factors (path rules, path type, path-user type) have an impact on interactions and journey experiences?

These questions are addressed using a mixed method approach. Phase I of data collection includes a quantitative intercept survey with path users as they travel along the Bristol to Bath shared-use path. In Phase II path users are asked to video record their journey along the case study path, this is then used as a discussion tool in a follow up in-depth interview.

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